Contributor Two Contributor Two
"I Played in the Band and Sang in the Choir"
Contributor Two Contributor Two
I Played In The Band And Sung In The Choir

I played in the band, I sang in a choir
I wrote a few songs that gave a few
people hope
Every once in a while I started a fi re
When they asked me up there,
“What did you do down there?”
I’ll say it was my heartfelt desire
To play in the band, to write a few
songs, and sing in the choir.

Some think you got to be the big dog
and lead all the little dogs around
You’ve got to sing a solo or preach a
great sermon or be the biggest,
hottest thing in town
I guess I’m just a simple man with a
simple desire
To play in the band, write a few songs,
Lord, I want to sing in the choir.

I played in the band, I sang in a choir
I wrote a few songs that gave a few
people hope
Every once in a while I started a fi re
When they asked me up there
“What did you do down there?”
I’ll say it was my heartfelt desire
To play in the band, write a few songs,
and sing in the choir.


Written by Larry Gatlin, Bill Gaither and Henry Slaughter ©2013 Mike Curb Music (BMI)/Barton Creek Music (BMI)/
Hanna Street Music (BMI)//Harvest Time Publishers (ASCAP)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Humble Henry — that’s what Bill Gaither calls him.

Henry Slaughter and his precious wife Hazel epitomize the essence of true Christian artists: kindness, generosity, love, faith, joy, talent and yes, real humility. There’s not an ounce of competitiveness in them.

In February 2012, Homecoming Magazine featured a tribute to Henry in the prestigious Hall of Honor. A few days after that issue was released, Bill and Gloria received a handwritten thank-you. The note, in typical Henry fashion, resonated with Gee whiz...you didn’t have to...what I did wasn’t a big deal...I loved every minute of it...

Now, every good gospel singer worth his salt knows the power of a big ending, and so does Henry. His closing? “I just played in the band, wrote a few songs and sang in the choir.” Well, if you give a writer like Bill a hook that sharp, he’s going fi shing for a song to hang on it!

Larry Gatlin is one of Bill’s favorite writing buddies. When the two of them collaborate on a song, it’s like watching a tennis match with seasoned pros as the ideas bounce back and forth. They act as a mutual muse to stimulate an ongoing fl ow of riveting creativity. It’s a beautiful thing to observe from the bleachers.

With Henry’s idea in mind, “I just played in the band, wrote a few songs and sang in the choir,” the skeletal concepts quickly began to take shape:
• Each person and every job in the Kingdom of God is important.

• There’s no room for the mindset, “We need to be big dogs leading the little dogs around.” No! The greatest is the servant of all.

• If we are wondering where to serve, let’s start with wherever we are.

• It’s ALL important. It ALL matters.

Bill wanted the spirit of the song to reflect one of his favorite hymns by Kittie L. Suffi eld, “Little Is Much When God Is in It.” This simple classic celebrates the often menial assignments and unnoticed laborers, reminding us that nothing is truly small or goes unseen by the Father. The music is pensive and reflective. Bill, Larry and Henry’s song, however, emerged with a snappy, toe-tapping beat and joyous music.

“Larry is what I call a street writer,” says Bill. “He speaks the language of the common man and puts the cookies on the lower shelf where everyone can reach them.” Obviously, those cookies baked up hot and yummy because the world of gospel gobbled them up!

When the Booth Brothers heard “I Played in the Band,” they were ecstatic to feature it on their project, A Tribute to the Songs of Bill and Gloria Gaither. The song won the coveted 2013 NQC Music Award for Song of the Year and the Booth Brothers’ CD was nominated for the prestigious 2013 Dove Award for Southern Gospel Album of the Year.

1 Peter 5:5 says, “ And all of you must put on the apron of humility, to serve one another; for the scripture says, ‘God resists the proud, but shows favor to the humble.’”

Thank you, Humble Henry, for putting on the apron so Bill and Larry could whip up this sweet treat of a song!