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'Immortal Diamond' Review
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IMMORTAL DIAMOND
by Richard Rohr

Just as Falling Upward by Richard Rohr helped us think about the two halves of life and how priorities and purposes should change as we become second-half-of-life livers and thinkers, so Rohr’s new book Immortal Diamond helps the reader see two selves: the false self and the real self.

And just as Rohr sees the first half of life as a time most people are obsessed with building a container and the second half of life as (hopefully) filling that “container” with things that last forever, so the false self is often the facade we construct that must (and eventually will, if only at death) fall away to reveal our true self, our eternal, lasting identity.

Rohr says that the false self is not a “bad” self, but just not the real one, and if reinforced and maintained throughout our lives, will prevent us from moving into the abundant living, the diamond of ourselves that God creates and intends us to uncover. This false self is counterfeit and obscures our vision of the pure, transcendent and eternal perspective, our authentic identity.

How do we find this authenticity? How do we mine this diamond? How do we recognize the masquerades with which our false self tries to clothe us?

Throughout this brilliant and challenging discussion, Rohr uses the metaphor of the resurrection as the “logical and full conclusion of incarnation.” When Christ is born in us, we, too, will eventually die to be resurrected. There are so many words of Jesus that come to mind as this truth is discussed. As Rohr puts it:
The risen Christ represents the final perspective of every True Self: the human-Divine one that is looking out at God from itself — and yet knowing that it is God-in-you seeing God-who-is-also-beyond-you and enjoying yourself as good and united.

This book is worth the thought and self-confrontation it demands. It is a wise elder with a second-half-of-life perspective, lifting the veil (or maybe our masks) to reveal a bright new vision of what we were intended to be—real, true and unashamed.