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"The Devil In Pew Number Seven"
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Rebecca Nichols Alonzo, a very lovely woman whom I was privileged to get to know this past spring — as our sons played baseball together — she knows firsthand how difficult it can be to forgive. But she also knows the freedom and the power of forgiveness in a very real way, and she gives a riveting and powerful testimony of that freedom in her autobiography, The Devil in Pew Number Seven.

Rebecca had every reason in the world to harbor resentment and hatred. The firstborn child of a pastor in Sellerstown, North Carolina, Rebecca recounts the terror that was unleashed on her family for a period of six years by a man obsessed with controlling the church, who would stop at nothing to eliminate anyone who got in his way. It started with anonymous threatening phone calls and letters and progressed to drive-by shootings and bombs. And then, when Rebecca was only 7 years old, her world came crashing down as a gunman walked into her home and shot both of her parents, while she and her 3-year-old brother watched in horror.

Rebecca’s story is captivating, and I found it difficult to put down. I was deeply moved as I read the devastating account of the unimaginable horror that she and her family endured. But her story didn’t end there. In fact, possibly the most intriguing part of the book is her testimony of forgiveness in the midst of deep pain and loss, and her commitment to God’s calling on her life — to share the message of His love to an unforgiving world. I highly recommend The Devil in Pew Number Seven, as it is sure to inspire and even to challenge readers who are struggling with forgiveness in their own lives.